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Iron Age hilltop enclosure at North Hill Cleave, circa 400m north-east of Outer Narracott Farm

A Scheduled Monument in Bittadon, Devon

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.1754 / 51°10'31"N

Longitude: -4.0788 / 4°4'43"W

OS Eastings: 254782.102915

OS Northings: 143851.170832

OS Grid: SS547438

Mapcode National: GBR KQ.66JL

Mapcode Global: VH4MC.8Q29

Entry Name: Iron Age hilltop enclosure at North Hill Cleave, circa 400m north-east of Outer Narracott Farm

Scheduled Date: 1 August 1977

Last Amended: 28 April 2015

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1019024

English Heritage Legacy ID: 32223

County: Devon

Civil Parish: Bittadon

Traditional County: Devon

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Devon

Church of England Parish: Bittadon St Peter

Church of England Diocese: Exeter

Summary

The earthworks and buried remains of an agglomerated Iron Age hilltop enclosure located on an east to west running ridge directly adjacent to North Hill Cleave, circa 400m north-east of Outer Narracott Farm.

Source: Historic England

Details

PRINCIPAL ELEMENTS
The earthworks and buried remains of an agglomerated Iron Age hilltop enclosure located on an east to west running ridge directly adjacent to North Hill Cleave, circa 400m north-east of Outer Narracott Farm.

DESCRIPTION
This agglomerated hilltop enclosure is comprised of at least three conjoined enclosures. At the centre is an oval-shaped enclosure which measures 60 metres long east to west by 34m wide north to south. It is defined by banks which measure up to 6m wide and 1.2m high. Attached to its west side is a second enclosure which is the largest of the three, measuring 196m long from north to south by 135m wide from east to west. It is denoted by banks standing up to 0.4m high and 1.2m wide. On its western side there is also a ditch which is up to 4.5m wide and 1.2m deep, but which peters out to both the north and south. The south-eastern corner of this larger enclosure has been disturbed by modern quarrying, with the spoil heaps and quarry pit occupying an area which measures 45m long from east to west and 28m wide from north to south; the pit is up to 2.6m deep. Leading from the quarry is a ditch which measures up to 4.5m wide and 1.2m deep. This is defined on its eastern side by a bank up to 1.2m wide and 0.4m high. A third embanked enclosure adjoins the northern side of the central oval enclosure and the north-east side of the larger second enclosure. Partial excavation in 1991 revealed the buried remains of its northern boundary in the form of a curvilinear ditch some 77m long. It has a V-shaped profile and is 2.3m wide and 1.6m deep, with the outside edge notably steeper than that of the inside. The likelihood of an entrance on the western side of this enclosure was revealed by the presence of a small outer bank. Its eastern boundary is not well-defined by earthworks although it is likely that the slight scarps represent the remnants of a former bank on that side. Lying to the west of the enclosure, in the adjoining field, there is an outer bank which stands to a height of less than 0.5m with a ditch shown as a slight undulation.

EXTENT OF SCHEDULING
The scheduling aims to protect the hilltop enclosure and surrounding archaeologically sensitive area. The constraint line mainly follows the inside edge of the existing field boundaries to the north, east and south while the western extent extends slightly into the adjoining field. The maximum extent of the monument is about 380m east to west by 240m north to south.

EXCLUSIONS
All modern fences, fences post and cattle troughs are excluded from the scheduling but the ground beneath them is included.

Source: Historic England

Reasons for Scheduling

The Iron Age hilltop enclosure at North Hill Cleave, circa 400m north-east of Outer Narracott Farm, is scheduled for the following principal reasons:
* Period: as one of a relatively limited number of sites characteristic of the early Iron Age;
* Rarity: with around 30 examples of hilltop enclosures recorded nationally its survival is important in understanding the transition between Bronze Age and Iron Age communities;
* Survival: despite reduction in its height through cultivation and some limited quarrying, it survives well as upstanding earthworks and buried remains;
* Potential: it will contain both archaeological information which will contribute to our understanding and knowledge of the social organisation of the area during the prehistoric period along with environmental information about the surrounding landscape;
* Documentation: archaeological reports published in the late C20 have increased our understanding of the significance of the enclosure;
* Group value: its close association with nearby funerary monuments and its commanding position on the summit of ridge indicates its importance to the local area.

Source: Historic England

Sources

Books and journals
Silvester, RJ, 'A Hillslope Enclosure at Collamoor, Bittadon' in Proceedings of the Devon Archaeological Society, , Vol. 36, (1978), 176-190
Other
South West Water Combe Martin Water Supply: Archaeological Assessment of a Hillslope Enclosure at North Hill Cleave, Bitttadon, 1991, Weddell, PJ, Exeter Museums Archaeological Field Unit Report No. 91.62
South West Water Combe Martin Water Supply: Archaeological Recording of a Hillslope Enclosure at North Hill Cleave, Bitttadon, 1992, Reed, S, and Pearce, P, Exeter Museums Archaeological Field Unit Report No. 92.19

Source: Historic England

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