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The remains of the Chapel of St Ia and adjacent cell

A Scheduled Monument in Camborne, Cornwall

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Coordinates

Latitude: 50.1971 / 50°11'49"N

Longitude: -5.2825 / 5°16'56"W

OS Eastings: 165830.901814

OS Northings: 38165.444425

OS Grid: SW658381

Mapcode National: GBR Z0.TMFT

Mapcode Global: VH12Q.D97R

Entry Name: The remains of the Chapel of St Ia and adjacent cell

Scheduled Date: 3 April 2017

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1441204

County: Cornwall

Civil Parish: Camborne

Traditional County: Cornwall

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Cornwall

Church of England Parish: Treslothan

Church of England Diocese: Truro

Summary

The monument includes a chapel in a wooded valley known as The Reens, and has three principal construction phases, dating initially from the C10. It stands on the E slope of the valley stream, and is a rectangular structure on a roughly E-to-W alignment. The remains of an associated cell is located on the opposite side of the stream at the base of Reen Rock outcrop, on a NW to SE alignment.

Source: Historic England

Details

PRINCIPAL ELEMENTS
The monument includes a chapel in a wooded valley known as The Reens, and has three principal construction phases, dating initially from the C10. It stands on the E slope of the valley stream, and is a rectangular structure on a roughly E-to-W alignment. The remains of an associated cell is located on the opposite side of the stream at the base of Reen Rock outcrop, on a NW to SE alignment.

DESCRIPTION
The 1966 excavation of the chapel uncovered evidence for a rectangular masonry structure with three principal phases of construction. The enclosure measures c3.6m wide by 10m long, centred on SW6583638168, with walls standing between 1-3m high. Evidence of remains associated with the first phase of construction were uncovered at the base of the W wall. The second phase of construction, with walls of granite and uncoursed metamorphic stone, has been built at a slightly different angle, measuring 3.6m N-S and c5m E-W. On the N side of the building are the remains of C12 granite door jambs and a window lintel. The third and final phase saw a significant enlargement eastwards by 4.5m with the E wall cutting into the sloping bedrock. A revetment at the base of the W wall dates to the final phase of rebuilding. The walls relating to the third phase are constructed of roughly-coursed, horizontally-laid blocks of granite and internally there are fragments of lime wash with evidence of painted motifs. Within the S wall are the remains of a C13 doorway and a window. Internally, next to the W end wall is what has been described as the infilled remains of the possible C10 well. At the E end are the remains of a C13 masonry ledge that incorporates two benches flanking a central altar, and a later chancel platform. There is evidence of another partial platform on the N side. The W end of the chapel stands at the top of a gully; it is c1.8m deep and 5m wide, and slopes down to the river.

Since the excavation the site has become covered in vegetation, with only the top sections of walls still exposed.

13m to the SW of the chapel, on the opposite side of the stream and at the base of the Reen Rock outcrop, is a detached cell (centred on SW6582238160) which survives as a ruin. Two and half sides of the structure remain visible above ground in the form of low granite walls. Other evidence associated with the structure is considered to survive as buried archaeological deposits.

Source: Historic England

Reasons for Scheduling

The remains of the Chapel of St Ia and adjacent cell are scheduled for the following principal reasons:
* Survival: the site retains significant standing and buried archaeological remains that represent the chapel’s three principal phases;
* Period: the chapel has pre-conquest origins, a period that is less well understood than later phases of church construction;
* Documentation: the documentary evidence has been enhanced by the 1960s archaeological excavation which provides evidence of the evolution and changing function of this site;
* Potential: the site has the potential to further contribute to our understanding of the development of pre- and post-conquest chapel building, as well as the practice of Christianity in rural Cornwall during the medieval period.

Source: Historic England

Sources

Books and journals
Orme, N, Cornwall and The Cross Christianity 500-1560 , (2007)
Orme, N, The Saints of Cornwall, (2002), 144
Thomas, C, Christian Antiquities of Camborne, (1967), 71; 77-85
Websites
St Ia Chapel Camborne, accessed 10 January 2017 from https://www.victoriacountyhistory.ac.uk/explore/items/st-ia-chapel-camborne
St Ia Chapel: Pastscape entry 425660, accessed 10 January 2017 from http://www.pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=425660

Source: Historic England

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