Ancient Monuments

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Achvraid, hut circles 800m south east of

A Scheduled Monument in Aird and Loch Ness, Highland

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Coordinates

Latitude: 57.4149 / 57°24'53"N

Longitude: -4.2508 / 4°15'2"W

OS Eastings: 264905

OS Northings: 838294

OS Grid: NH649382

Mapcode National: GBR H9W3.TX4

Mapcode Global: WH3FJ.PW1K

Entry Name: Achvraid, hut circles 800m SE of

Scheduled Date: 1 March 2007

Source: Historic Environment Scotland

Source ID: SM11786

Schedule Class: Cultural

Category: Prehistoric domestic and defensive: hut circle, roundhouse

Location: Inverness and Bona

County: Highland

Electoral Ward: Aird and Loch Ness

Traditional County: Inverness-shire

Description

The monument comprises of the remains of two hut circles, visible as upstanding walls. The hut circles are likely to be Late Bronze Age or Iron Age, dating to the first or second millennium BC. The monument lies on a low ridge on Essich Moor, at 210-215m OD, just to the W of Carn Glas chambered cairns. Neither of these hut circles is marked on the 1:10000 map.

The northernmost hut circle is 5m in diameter; the other 14m, including banks 1m wide. Both have entrances in the eastern arc.

The area to be scheduled comprises two circles on plan, each centred on a hut circle, to include the remains described and an area around in which evidence for their construction and use may survive, as shown in red on the accompanying map.

Source: Historic Environment Scotland

Statement of Scheduling

Cultural Significance

The monument's archaeological significance can be expressed as follows:

Intrinsic characteristics: The monument is a well-preserved example of two later prehistoric roundhouses with upstanding remains dating to the first or second millennium BC. Given the site's current use as pasture, it is likely that archaeologically significant deposits relating to the construction, use and abandonment of the structures remain in situ. In addition, it is likely that deposits survive that could provide data relating to the later prehistoric environment.

The site has considerable potential to enhance understanding of later prehistoric roundhouses and the daily lives of the people who occupied them.

Contextual characteristics: The monument is a good representative of a once common class. Several other hut circle sites lie within 1km of this monument, and together these elements have the potential to provide a better understanding of how later prehistoric society was structured. The siting of the hut circles next to a massive, earlier monument is potentially of interest too in terms of the uses and values that people later applied to such places.

National Importance

The monument is of national importance because it has an inherent potential to make a significant addition to the understanding of the past, in particular Bronze- or Iron-Age society and the nature of later prehistoric domestic practice. Its good preservation and the survival of marked field characteristics enhance this potential. The loss of the example would significantly impede our ability to understand later prehistory in northern Scotland.

Source: Historic Environment Scotland

Sources

Bibliography

RCAHMS record the monument as NH63NW 17.

Photographs:

C26237 1994 Achvraid: hut-circles; field -system; cord rig; rig; lade.

C26237 1994 Achvraid: hut-circles; field -system; cord rig; rig; lade.

C26239 1994 Achvraid: hut-circles; field -system; cord rig; rig; lade.

C26240 1994 Achvraid: hut-circles; field -system; cord rig; rig; lade.

Source: Historic Environment Scotland

Other nearby scheduled monuments

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