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Prehistoric settlement, three round cairns and a post-medieval rabbit warren at Legis Tor

A Scheduled Monument in Shaugh Prior, Devon

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Coordinates

Latitude: 50.4718 / 50°28'18"N

Longitude: -4.0124 / 4°0'44"W

OS Eastings: 257290.211692

OS Northings: 65491.688874

OS Grid: SX572654

Mapcode National: GBR Q3.0M54

Mapcode Global: FRA 27HT.0NL

Entry Name: Prehistoric settlement, three round cairns and a post-medieval rabbit warren at Legis Tor

Scheduled Date: 2 October 1952

Last Amended: 9 April 2001

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1019876

English Heritage Legacy ID: 22289

County: Devon

Civil Parish: Shaugh Prior

Traditional County: Devon

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Devon

Details

This monument includes an extensive prehistoric settlement, three round
cairns, a post-medieval rabbit warren, two lengths of leat, two tinners'
buildings and a small area of tin streamwork earthworks situated on the south
facing side of Legis Tor overlooking the valley of the River Plym.
The prehistoric settlement includes a series of enclosures situated along the
lower slopes of Legis Tor, 58 associated stone hut circles and several
lengths of boundary wall. The largest enclosure is agglomerate and includes
six distinct enclosed areas each defined by a rubble wall standing up to 3m
wide and 1m high. The overall dimensions of this enclosure are 135m north to
south by 200m east to west. Lengths of field boundary lead west, north and
east from the enclosure towards other enclosures and stone hut circles.
Nineteen stone hut circles lie within this enclosure; of these, two are free
standing, whilst the remainder are attached to enclosure boundaries. The stone
hut circles survive as banks of stone and earth surrounding circular internal
areas which vary between 2.5m and 7m, with the average being 4.97m in
diameter. The heights of the surrounding walls vary between 0.3m and 1m, with
the average being 0.69m. Eight of the huts have visible doorways and two have
porches. Eight huts were partly excavated by the Dartmoor Exploration
Committee during 1895. This work revealed that the floors were level, the
upper part unpaved and formed by the subsoil, the lower part generally made up
and paved. In several huts there was a stone hearth, generally associated with
a cooking hole, many of which contained substantial pottery sherds. It has
been suggested that at least some of the pottery is of Neolithic date,
although recent work supports an Early Bronze Age date. Rounded cooking
stones, many of them splintered by the action of the fire, were found in
considerable numbers. Other artefacts recovered from the huts included
coarsely chipped flint flakes and scrapers, a triangular polished stone and a
broken spindle whorl.
In the area west of the large agglomerate enclosure are at least three lengths
of interconnected sinuous boundary banks forming a field system which links an
isolated stone hut circle, a semi-oval enclosure and the agglomerate enclosure
itself. The stone hut circle lies at the north east end of the boundary bank
and includes a 1.7m wide and 0.9m high orthostatic wall surrounding an
internal area measuring 4.7m in diameter. This hut was also excavated by the
Dartmoor Exploration Committee who recovered a flint flake, but no other signs
of human occupancy. The semi-oval enclosure is attached to the western edge of
the field system, measures internally 45m north to south by 22m east to west
and is defined by a rubble wall 1m wide and up to 0.8m high on three sides
with the fourth being denoted by a river scarp. Three `D'-shaped stone
structures are attached to the inner face of the eastern boundary wall. The
northern structure measures 4m by 3m and is defined by a 1m wide and 0.4m high
rubble wall. The central structure measures 9.7m by 4.6m and is defined by an
orthostatic wall, 1m wide and 0.9m high. The southern structure measures 11m
by 4m and is surrounded by a 1.2m wide and 0.5m high rubble wall. These
structures are very different in character to the huts found within other
enclosures at Legis Tor and may therefore not represent Bronze Age
habitations. A small triangular shaped building attached to the outer face of
the southern boundary wall measures 5m by 3m and has a gap in its north
eastern wall which may represent a doorway. This structure is similar in
character to some tinners' buildings found in Devon and Cornwall, and it may
therefore be associated with the nearby tin streamwork.
The only other prehistoric feature in the area west of the large agglomerate
enclosure is a stone hut circle attached to a length of boundary wall which
in turn partly underlies one of the agglomerate enclosure boundaries. This
relationship strongly suggests the presence of a pre-agglomerate enclosure
phase of settlement. The interior of the stone hut circle is oval in shape,
measures 5.3m long by 3m wide, and is defined by a 1.7m wide wall standing up
to 0.8m high. A gap in the outer wall facing SSW represents an original
doorway. This hut was excavated by the Dartmoor Exploration Committee who
recovered pottery sherds which are now considered to be of Early Bronze Age
date.
A length of boundary wall leads north east from the agglomerate enclosure
to a small oval enclosure, which is the only example within the settlement
containing no visible structures. The enclosure measures internally 25m east
to west by 15m north to south and is defined by a rubble wall 1.2m wide and up
to 0.6m high.
In the area immediately east of the large agglomerate enclosure are a few
lengths of field boundary and 11 stone hut circles. Nine of the huts are
circular in plan, and the internal diameters of these huts vary between
2.1m and 9.5m, the average being 4.92m. The height of the surrounding walls
varies between 0.3m and 1.4m, with the average being 0.55m. The remaining two
huts are oval in plan, measure between 3.1m and 3.9m long by 1.9m and 2.9m
wide, and are defined by 0.3m high walls. One hut has three annexes attached
to its outer face, three of the huts are attached to boundary walls, two are
attached to a small enclosure and three have visible doorways.
In the area east of these stone hut circles are a group of three enclosures,
six stone hut circles and a small `D'-shaped structure. The southern enclosure
measures internally 60m east to west by 33m north to south and is defined by a
rubble wall 2.5m wide and up to 0.9m high. The northern enclosure is attached
to the northern side of the first, measures 66m east to west by 45m north to
south and is defined by rubble walling.
An arm of banking extending to the north west from the northern enclosure may
represent the upper part of a third enclosure whose western and southern walls
were either never completed or survive as buried features. Six stone hut
circles composed of circular banks of stone and earth surrounding an internal
area survive either within the enclosure or are attached to the walls. Five of
the stone hut circles are circular in shape and their internal diameters vary
between 2.3m and 6.3m, with the average being 4.74m. The height of the
surrounding wall varies between 0.4m and 0.7m, with the average being 0.54m.
The remaining hut is oval in shape, measures internally 3m long by 2.3m wide
and is surrounded by a 1m wide and 0.35m high wall. The `D'-shaped structure
survives as a semi-circular area measuring 10m by 7m defined by a curving 1.3m
wide and 0.4m high rubble wall on one side and by the northern enclosure
boundary on the other. The date and function of this structure is unclear.
A solitary stone hut circle lying to the north of this group of enclosures
measures 6m in diameter and is defined by a 2m wide wall standing up to 0.4m
high. A further group of six unenclosed stone hut circles lies east of the
enclosures. The internal diameters of these huts vary between 4.2m and
8.6m, with the average being 6.05m. The height of the surrounding walls
varies between 0.3m and 0.8m, with the average being 0.6m. Two of the huts
are two-roomed buildings and one has a visible doorway.
A small kidney-shaped enclosure lies close to these huts and measures
internally 52m north to south by 30m east to west and is defined by a 3m wide
and 0.6m high rubble wall. Three stone hut circles are attached to this
enclosure boundary, and they measure between 4m and 4.5m in diameter and are
surrounded by walls standing between 0.6m and 0.8m high. Four unenclosed
stone hut circles lie in the area east of this enclosure. These huts measure
between 4m and 5.4m in diameter and are surrounded by walls standing between
0.4m and 0.9m high. Two of the huts have visible doorways and the third is
attached to a forecourt and length of boundary bank.
The easternmost enclosure at Legis Tor is sub-oval in shape, measures
internally 100m north to south by 95m east to west and is defined by single
walling of natural boulders except on the north side where it is of double
walled construction. The walling averages 2m wide and 0.9m high and a gap in
each of the western and southern sides may represent original entrances.
Attached to the inner face of the enclosure boundary on the western side are
two sub-rectangular yards with internal dimensions of 8m long by up to 7m
wide. A third rectangular yard straddles the western boundary of the enclosure
and this measures 11m long by 10m wide. A further sub-division of the
enclosure survives within the north eastern part where a 40m long and 20m wide
area is defined by a 1.2m wide and 0.3m high rubble bank. Three stone hut
circles are attached to the enclosure boundary and a further two examples lie
within the enclosed area. The internal diameters of these huts vary between
3.8m and 6.5m, with the average being 4.62m. The height of the surrounding
walls varies between 0.4m and 0.5m, with the average being 0.44m. The final
stone hut circle within the settlement lies a short distance from the eastern
enclosure and is situated on a narrow terrace immediately above the River
Plym. This hut measures 4.3m in diameter and the surrounding wall is 1.4m wide
and 0.5m high.
On the hillslope above the eastern part of the settlement are three round
cairns. The perimeters of all three mounds are denoted in places by stones
set on edge, which indicate the presence of kerbs which survive partly as
buried features. The western mound measures 5.4m in diameter and stands up to
0.6m high. The central mound measures 6m in diameter and stands up to 0.3m
high. The mound contains a cist orientated SSE to NNW which has both sideslabs
and the northern end slab in place, giving a length of 0.9m, a width of 0.6m
and a depth of 0.35m. The capstone is displaced to the south and is 1.2m by
1.5m and 0.25m in thickness. This cairn was examined by the Dartmoor
Exploration Committee during 1895, but no artefacts were recovered. The
eastern mound measures 4m in diameter and stands up to 0.6m high. It too
contains a cist orientated north west to south east which measures 0.6m long
by 0.5m wide and 0.4m deep. One side and one end of the cist are in situ, the
other side slab has fallen and the other end and the capstone are missing.
The rabbit warren at Legis Tor is sometimes called New Warren and may have
operated jointly with Trowlesworthy Warren until recent times when it became
an adjunct of Ditsworthy Warren. The name New Warren strongly suggests that
there was an earlier warren on the site. Dating of the warren is difficult
because there are no documentary references although it is generally accepted
that the warren on the other side of the River Plym at Trowlesworthy had been
established by 1292. A large proportion of the warren is included within this
scheduling, with only a few outlying pillow mounds and vermin traps being
included as part of other schedulings. The warren components lying within this
scheduling include a series of seven enclosed areas containing pillow mounds
and vermin traps. The pillow mounds survive as flat-topped, oblong-shaped
mounds of soil and stone surrounded on at least three sides by the ditch from
which material was quarried during the construction of the mound. Clearly
defined shallow gullies lead from the lower end of many mounds. These have
traditionally been interpreted as drainage ditches, but they may also have
served as preferred access routes (or creeps) for rabbits and vermin. Traps
placed within these gullies could have been used to control both rabbit and
vermin populations. Most of the mounds lie with their long axis perpendicular
to the hillslope.
The vermin traps survive as `V'- or `X'-shaped gullies or walls which were
specifically constructed to trap predators. Vermin approaching their quarry
tend to seek a route that provides visual cover and the purpose of the trap
was therefore to funnel the predators along the ditches or beside the wall
towards a central point where they could be trapped.
The north western warren enclosure at Legis Tor measures 133m north to south
by 144m east to west, contains one pillow mound and is defined on the north
and east sides by a 1.4m wide and 0.6m high bank with an external ditch
measuring 1.3m wide and 0.6m deep. The southern edge is formed by the northern
side of another warren enclosure and the western edge is formed by Legis Lake.
The enclosure boundary probably did not prevent the rabbits moving into other
areas of the warren, but would have provided protection against some
predators. Vermin would have tended to approach the enclosure along the ditch
and therefore could have been trapped more effectively within this confined
area. The pillow mound within this enclosure survives as a 17.4m long, 5.6m
wide and 1m high flat-topped, oblong-shaped mound of soil and stone surrounded
by the 2.6m wide and 0.8m deep ditch from which material was quarried during
the construction of the mound. A clearly defined shallow gully leads south
west for 7m from the lower end of the mound.
The large western rabbit enclosure at Legis Tor measures 375m long by 300m
wide, contains 15 pillow mounds and one vermin trap and is defined on the
north and east by a 1.6m wide and 0.7m high bank with an external ditch
measuring 1.2m wide and 0.8m deep. The western and southern edges of the
enclosure are formed by the Legis Lake and River Plym respectively. The pillow
mounds within this enclosed area are between 12m and 42.9m long, between 4.6m
and 7.3m wide and between 0.8m and 1.8m high. The average length of the mounds
is 24.29m, the average width is 6.24m and the average height is 1.26m. The
quarry ditches surrounding the mounds vary between 1m and 2.4m wide and
between 0.2m and 0.7m in depth. The average width is 1.78m and the average
depth is 0.53m.
The vermin trap lies immediately to the north of the large prehistoric
agglomerate enclosure and includes a `V'-shaped rubble wall with a narrow
passage situated at the point. The eastern arm measures 4.4m long and the
western arm is 2m long. A piece of slate found in the narrow passage probably
represents part of the original shutter device for the trap. A single pillow
mound lying immediately east of this large warren enclosure measures 10.4m
long, 5.8m wide, 0.9m high and is surrounded by a 2m wide and 0.4m deep ditch.
A third enclosure lies 50m to the east of this mound and survives as a 130m
long by 80m wide area defined on the north, west and east sides by a 1.6m wide
and 0.5m high bank with an external ditch measuring 1.2m wide and 0.6m deep.
The solitary pillow mound lying within this area measures 16.4m long, 6.5m
wide, 1.2m high and is surrounded by a 2.4m wide and 0.7m deep ditch.
This enclosure may have been a breeding area in which rabbits were raised for
the purpose of stocking outlying mounds. A second possible breeding area
lies 10m to the east and includes a reused Bronze Age enclosure, measuring
80m by 60m in which a pillow mound and vermin trap were constructed. The
pillow mound measures 27m long, 6.5m wide, 0.9m high and is surrounded by a 2m
wide and 0.4m deep ditch. The vermin trap survives as a `V'-shaped ditch
measuring 0.6m wide and 0.2m deep. The eastern arm measures 30m long and the
western arm is 17m long. A slight bank representing material upcast during the
construction of the trap, survives on either side of the ditch. This
particular vermin trap would have provided cover for the rabbits living in the
pillow mound from vermin approaching from the River Plym.
The eastern part of the warren is dominated by three large enclosed areas.
The first of these lies parallel with the river terrace of the Plym, measures
550m long by 150m wide, contains seven pillow mounds and four vermin traps,
and is defined on the north and west by a 1.4m wide and 0.5m high bank with an
external ditch measuring 1.2m wide and 0.7m deep. The eastern and southern
edges of the enclosed area are formed by the River Plym. The pillow mounds
within this enclosed area are between 12m and 25.9m long, between 5m and 7m
long and between 0.25m and 1.3m high. The average length of the mounds is 19m,
the average width is 6.4m and the average height is 1.08m. The quarry ditches
surrounding the mounds are between 1.3m and 2.3m wide and between 0.1m and
0.6m deep. The average width is 1.88m and the average depth is 0.44m. The four
vermin traps are confined to the southern part of the enclosed area. The
western trap is situated between two stone hut circles and includes a `V'-
shaped wall with a narrow 3m long passage situated at the point. The northern
arm measures 6m long and the southern arm is 4m long. The second trap lies
north west of the first and includes two `V'-shaped lengths of walling
together forming an `X'-shaped trap with the narrow funnel trapping area
situated in the centre of the feature. This structure utilises lengths of
prehistoric enclosure walling in its construction, with only short lengths of
new walling being required to form the trap. A length of ditch and bank
leading from the rabbit enclosure boundary may have been designed to collect
vermin from the hillside above this area. The third trap lies north east of
the second and includes a `V'-shaped rubble wall with a narrow 2.5m long
passage situated at the point. The northern arm measures 10m long and the
southern is 5m long. The final trap within this enclosed area includes a `V'-
shaped rubble wall with a narrow 1.5m long and 0.6m wide passage situated at
the point. The two arms are both 8m long.
The northernmost warren enclosure contains ten pillow mounds, measures 470m
long by 180m wide and is defined on the north, west and south by a 1.8m wide
and 0.7m high bank with an external ditch measuring 2.5m wide and 0.9m
deep. The eastern edge of this enclosure is formed by the River Plym. The
pillow mounds within this enclosed area are between 9.7m and 42m long,
between 4.7m and 7m wide and between 0.7m and 2m high. The average length
of the mounds is 19.82m, the average width is 5.82m and the average height is
1.16m. The quarry ditches surrounding the mounds vary between 1.3m and 4m
wide and between 0.2m and 1.7m deep. The average width is 2.32m and the
average depth is 0.77m.
The final enclosed area contains six pillow mounds and is only partly
enclosed, with the northern, eastern and part of the southern edges being
formed by boundaries associated with other enclosures. The remaining length of
the southern edge and part of the western edge is formed by a 200m length of
ditch and bank. The pillow mounds within this partly enclosed area measure
between 12.4m and 30m long, between 5m and 7.5m wide and between 0.6m, and
1.2m high. The average length of the mounds is 16.3m, the average width is
6.17 and the average height is 0.88m. The quarry ditches surrounding the
mounds vary between 1.7m and 2.5m wide and between 0.2m and 0.7m deep. The
average width is 2.1m and the average depth is 0.36m.
Six pillow mounds, within the monument do not lie within enclosed areas. The
western example survives as a 14.9m long, 4.7m wide and 1.1m high flat-topped
mound surrounded by a 1.4m wide and 0.9m deep ditch. The remaining five mounds
are clustered together and measure between 15m and 37.6m long, between 6m and
7.3m wide and between 1.2m and 1.4m high. The average length of the mounds is
23.22m, the average width is 6.7m and the average height is 1.28m. The quarry
ditches surrounding the mounds vary between 2.1m and 2.4m wide and between
0.4m and 0.7m deep. The average width is 2.28m and the average depth is 0.5m.
Two separate leats cut through the monument. The upper leat includes an 800m
length of the Yeoland Consols leat which was constructed during the 19th
century to serve the Yeoland Consols mine at Clearbrook, some 5km distant. The
leat measures 1.7m wide by 0.7m deep and the associated bank upcast downslope
during the cutting ofthe leat is 1.6m wide and 0.8m high. A number of granite
slabs laid across the channel represent original footbridges. The leat cuts
through a number of prehistoric enclosure walls, pillow mounds and other
features associated with the rabbit warren. The second leat includes a 440m
length of channel which measures 1.3m wide by 0.3m deep and the associated
bank upcast during the cutting of the leat is 1.3m wide and 0.3m high. This
leat was constructed and had fallen into disuse at some time before the
building of at least some of the pillow mounds, since at least two of the
mound quarries cut into the line of the channel. This leat was probably
associated with alluvial streamworking within the Plym valley. A small area of
alluvial streamworks are included within this scheduling. This part of the
streamwork includes six parallel banks measuring 3m wide and 1.3m high. These
banks represent waste material thrown systematically downstream into
previously worked areas by tinners exploiting alluvial deposits. The alignment
and shape of the mounds indicates that exploitation was carried out in an
eastward direction and using only shovels to dispose of the waste gravel and
stones. This area of streamworking underlies a later pillow mound. In the
immediate vicinity of the streamworks are two buildings which have been
identified as tinners' buildings. The westernmost building includes a two-
roomed structure, terraced into the south facing scarp of the River Plym, and
defined by 2m wide and 1.3m high rubble walls. The interior of the western
room measures 4m square and contains a small, 1.9m long by 0.9m wide, stone
lined compartment built against the south western corner. A gap in the western
wall represents an original doorway. The interior of the eastern room measures
4m long by 3m wide. The second building is a single-roomed structure and is
defined by a 1.2m wide and 1m high coursed wall. The interior of the room
measures 3m long by 1.5m wide and a recess in the northern wall represents a
fire place, whose lintel has collapsed into the room. A clearly defined
doorway survives in the southern wall.
Within the monument are three further structures which are considered to
be associated with post-medieval exploitation of the area. All three
structures are attached to the large prehistoric agglomerate enclosure.
The first structure includes a building composed of rubble walling, 1m wide
and 0.3m high, defining a rectangular interior measuring 7m long north to
south by 5m wide east to west. The second structure is also attached to the
agglomerate enclosure and includes a sub-rectangular interior measuring
9.5m long by 6m wide, defined by 1.8m wide and 1m high rubble walling. This
structure has been identified as a possible animal pound or shelter. The
final structure includes a 1.8m long and 1m wide compartment defined by a
rubble wall standing up to 0.4m high. It is considered that this structure is
a cache in which materials, tools or valuables would be hidden until required.
This monument is surrounded on three sides by an alluvial tin streamwork
which is not, however, included in the scheduling.

MAP EXTRACT
The site of the monument is shown on the attached map extract.
It includes a 2 metre boundary around the archaeological features,
considered to be essential for the monument's support and preservation.

Source: Historic England

Reasons for Scheduling

Dartmoor is the largest expanse of open moorland in southern Britain and,
because of exceptional conditions of preservation, it is also one of the most
complete examples of an upland relict landscape in the whole country. The
great wealth and diversity of archaeological remains provide direct evidence
for human exploitation of the Moor from the early prehistoric period onwards.
The well-preserved and often visible relationship between settlement sites,
major land boundaries, trackways, ceremonial and funerary monuments as well as
later industrial remains, gives significant insights into successive changes
in the pattern of land use through time. Stone hut circles and hut settlements
were the dwelling places of prehistoric farmers on Dartmoor. They mostly date
from the Bronze Age, with the earliest examples on the Moor in this building
tradition dating to about 1700 BC. The stone-based round houses consist of low
walls or banks enclosing a circular floor area; remains of the turf or thatch
roof are not preserved. The huts may occur singly or in small or large groups
and may lie in the open or be enclosed by a bank of earth and stone. Although
they are common on the Moor, their longevity and their relationship with other
monument types provide important information on the diversity of social
organisation and farming practices amongst prehistoric communities. They are
particularly representative of their period and a substantial proportion of
surviving examples are considered worthy of protection.

In addition to the hut circle settlement, three round cairns survive within
this monument. Round cairns are prehistoric funerary monuments dating to the
Bronze Age (about 2000-700 BC). They were constructed as earthern or rubble
mounds, the latter predominating in areas of upland Britain where such raw
materials were locally available in abundance. Round cairns may cover single
or multiple burials and are sometimes surrounded by an outer ditch. Often
occupying prominent locations, they are a major visual element in the modern
landscape. Their considerable variation in form and longevity as a monument
type provide important information on the diversity of beliefs and social
organisation amongst prehistoric communities. They are particularly
representative of their period and a substantial proportion of surviving
examples are considered worthy of protection. Dartmoor provides one of the
best preserved and most dense concentrations of round cairns in south western
Britain.
A large part of a rabbit warren survives within this monument. Warrens are
areas of land set aside for the breeding and management of rabbits or hares,
usually comprising a series of purpose-built breeding places known as pillow
mounds and buries, vermin traps and enclosures to contain and protect the
animals, and living quarters for the warrener who kept charge of the warren.
Pillow mounds are low oblong-shaped mounds of soil and/or stones in which the
animals lived. They are usually between 15m and 40m in length and between 5m
and 10m in width. Most have a ditch around at least three sides to facilitate
drainage. Inside, are a series of interconnected narrow trenches excavated
and covered with stone or turf before the mound was erected. Vermin traps of
various kinds are found within most warrens. These consist of a small
stone-lined passage into which the predator was funnelled by a series of
ditches or walls. Over one hundred vermin traps have been recorded on the
Moor, with the majority lying in the Plym valley. The warren boundaries were
often defined by a combination of natural features such as rivers and walls.
Within the warrens themselves smaller enclosed areas defined by a ditch and
bank are sometimes found, and some of these may have been specialised breeding
areas. Many of the warrens on the Moor contain a house in which the warrener
lived.
Most of the surviving warren earthworks probably date to between the 17th
century and the later part of the 19th century and some continued in use into
the early part of the 20th century. At least 22 warrens are known to exist on
the Moor and together they contribute to our understanding of the medieval and
post-medieval exploitation of the area. All well-preserved warrens are
therefore considered worthy of protection.
The two tinners' buildings lying within the monument survive well and may
contain information relating to the exploitation of alluvial tin within the
Plym valley. Two leats also cut across the monument. Various post-medieval
shelters, pounds, a cache and a small area of alluvial streamworking provide
evidence for continued use of the monument in the post-medieval period.
The prehistoric settlement, three round cairns and rabbit warren at Legis Tor
survive well despite limited post-medieval interference and antiquarian
investigation. The monument forms a complex archaeological landscape
containing archaeological and environmental information concerning the
exploitation of the upper Plym valley between the Bronze Age and the post-
medieval period.

Source: Historic England

Sources

Books and journals
Crossing, W, Crossing's Dartmoor Worker, (1992)
Worth, R H, Worth's Dartmoor, (1981)
Baring-Gould, S, 'Devonshire Association Transactions' in Eighth Report of the Dartmoor Exploration Committee, , Vol. 34, (1902)
Baring-Gould, S, 'Devonshire Association Transactions' in Third Report of the Dartmoor Exploration Committee, , Vol. 28, (1896)
Baring-Gould, S, 'Devonshire Association Transactions' in Third Report of the Dartmoor Exploration Committee, , Vol. 28, (1896)
Baring-Gould, S, 'Devonshire Association Transactions' in Third Report of the Dartmoor Exploration Committee, , Vol. 28, (1896)
Fox, A, 'Archaeologia Cambrensis' in Early Settlement on Dartmoor and in North Wales, , Vol. 101, (1951)
Griffiths, W E, 'Archaeologia Cambrensis' in Early Settlement in Caernarvonshire, , Vol. 101, (1951)
Radford, C A R, 'Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society' in Prehistoric Settlements on Dartmoor and the Cornish Moors, , Vol. 18, (1952)
Other
Dennison, E. and Darvill, T.C., Single Monument Class Description - Stone Hut Circles,
Dennison, E. and Darvill, T.C., Single Monument Class Description - Warren,
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE120,
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE239,
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE360,
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE363,
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE4,
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE4.2,
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE465,
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE466,
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE487,
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE529,
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE534,
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE535,
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE70,
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE71,
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE72,
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56SE4,
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX57NE4, (1982)
Gerrard, G.A.M., The Early Cornish Tin Industry: An Arch. & Historical Survey, 1986, Unpubl. PhD thesis, St David's, Wales
Gerrard, S, MPP Fieldwork,
Gerrard, S., MPP Fieldwork,
Gibson, A, Single Monument Class Description - Stone Hut Circles, (1987)
Gibson, A, Single Monument Class Description - Stone Hut Circles, (1987)
Gibson, A, Single Monument Class Description - Stone Hut Circles, (1987)
Gibson, A., MPP Dartmoor - Evaluation of Enclosures, (1988)
Heal, S.V.E., Schedule Entry Copy for National Monument No: 10589,
Heal, S.V.E., Schedule Entry Copy for National Monument No: 10590,
MPP Fieldwork by S Gerrard,
National Archaeological Record, SX56NE154,
Plate 16, Greeves, T A P, The Archaeology of Dartmoor from the Air, (1985)
Worth, R.H., Twentieth Report of the Barrow Committee,

Source: Historic England

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