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Prehistoric to post-medieval settlement, and religious and funerary remains on the middle and lower slopes west and south of Roughtor

A Scheduled Monument in Advent, Cornwall

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Coordinates

Latitude: 50.5989 / 50°35'56"N

Longitude: -4.626 / 4°37'33"W

OS Eastings: 214253.842692

OS Northings: 80979.037053

OS Grid: SX142809

Mapcode National: GBR N6.CRKR

Mapcode Global: FRA 176H.1MN

Entry Name: Prehistoric to post-medieval settlement, and religious and funerary remains on the middle and lower slopes west and south of Roughtor

Scheduled Date: 4 March 1968

Last Amended: 9 April 2001

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1019172

English Heritage Legacy ID: 15548

County: Cornwall

Civil Parish: Advent

Traditional County: Cornwall

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Cornwall

Church of England Parish: St Breward

Church of England Diocese: Truro

Details

The monument includes extensive remains from successive phases of prehistoric
to post-medieval activity across the middle and lower slopes on the west and
south of Roughtor on north western Bodmin Moor. The remains include complex
prehistoric settlements and field systems, over 17 prehistoric cairns,
pertaining both to funerary activity and surface rubble clearance, and at
least six small prehistoric religious sites called kerbed boulders. Early
medieval to post-medieval pastoral activity has produced at least nine
shepherd's shelters, while more intensive later medieval exploitation led to a
pasture boundary across the western lower slope, a large block of fields over
the south east flank of Roughtor and the base slabs of two medieval crosses
reflecting former routes across the Moor. Post-medieval activity has resulted
in many traces of moorstone splitting, roughouts of millstones and at least
one trough, turf storage platforms and trackways. This scheduling is divided
into three separate areas of protection.
The overall complex of prehistoric settlement remains comprises a range of
components: field systems, enclosures, areas cleared of surface rubble, long
linear boundaries subdividing much of the slope into large blocks, and over
200 prehistoric hut circles, most forming dense concentrations across the
lower slopes north west and south of Roughtor. The various relationships
between these components and their patterning across the terrain demonstrates
the sequence of prehistoric land uses of these hillslopes.
Early in the sequence are scattered areas called clearance plots, whose
surface rubble has been cleared to their edges but not used to create walled
fields. These are most apparent along the margins of the boulder scree,
locally called clitter, around the upper slopes west, south west and south of
Roughtor. Here they form small, rounded, stone-free areas, often as small as
10m across and separated by spreads of clitter. Towards the lower edge of the
clitter they become larger and interconnect, accompanied by cleared rubble
along their lower edges and occasionally mounded as clearance cairns within
them. Associated with the clearance plots are habitation sites called house
platforms, small rounded areas measuring up to 6m across, cleared and
levelled, sometimes on a low rubble terrace, but lacking the walling of hut
circles. One survives west of Showery Tor and another west of Roughtor, both
on the upper slope. At lower levels the middle slope is more extensively
stone-free, partly due to natural exhaustion of downslope clitter movement,
but scattered small cairns also betray deliberate clearance. Over most of the
scheduling beyond the clearance plots, and extending beyond this scheduling to
the north, the earliest settlement evidence comprises a network of sinuous
rubble banks defining quite large irregular fields laid out by piecemeal
additions, eventually encompassing much of the slope as an irregular aggregate
field system. Where least affected by later activity, on the midslopes west of
Showery Tor and south of Roughtor, plots are commonly 50m-100m across, defined
by rubble banks with occasional edge-set slabs. The banks' effect on downslope
soil movement due to prehistoric cultivation often produces a step in surface
level to each side called a lynchet. Some plots on the lower slope south west
of Roughtor are partly defined by natural banks of rubble slumped downslope
during glacial freeze-thaw conditions. Most, but not all, hut circles in this
scheduling are associated with this field system, with walls integrated with
the field system banks and suffering similar robbing of their fabric due to
later prehistoric land use changes. These tend to be the smaller hut circles,
with rounded interiors generally in the range 2.5m-6m across and often, but
not always, levelled into the slope. Where sufficiently intact, their rubble
banks are often faced by edge-set slabs internally, and occasionally
externally too. Entrances are commonly flanked by large end-set slabs and
usually face southerly aspects. Although many will have been houses, the
smallest examples may have served as ancillary buildings. Dense spreads of
such hut circles occur across the lower middle slope north west and south of
Roughtor, with a much more dispersed scatter on its south west flank and at
higher levels on the south and south east sides.
Over most of its area, the irregular field system was deliberately dismantled
later in the prehistoric period, transforming an enclosed landscape, in which
arable was important, into a more open landscape for a predominantly pastoral
economy. Unless reused in the later phase, most irregular field system banks
were robbed of rubble, leaving very slight banks or scarps with little visible
stone. Elsewhere, and especially at higher levels, field walls were broken
into discontinuous lengths, frequently including a row of clearance cairns.
Many hut circles were also robbed of wall rubble, leaving their levelled
stance but often with one or both entrance slabs still in place, an anomaly
possibly of superstitious origin.
The later prehistoric settlement phase responsible for opening up the
landscape is characterised by scatters of ovoid and polygonal enclosures over
the same lower middle slope terrain as the earlier hut circles north west and
south of Roughtor. Each area contains several large enclosures, generally
50m-100m across but up to 135m on the southern flank, interspersed with
smaller enclosures, often 15m-30m across. The enclosures usually have
substantial rubble walls faced by edge-set slabs and several show marked
lynchetting suggesting cultivation of their interiors. Some enclosures,
particularly the polygonal ones, derive their outlines from truncated portions
of the earlier irregular field system. The enclosures are associated with
between one and five hut circles each, with similarly substantial walls,
singly or double faced, and frequently with entrance jamb slabs. Their walls
define levelled interiors, commonly 5m-6m across but up to 9m in diameter. The
hut circles are generally incorporated into the enclosure wall, though
occasional examples occur within or closely outside the enclosures.
Broadly contemporary with the phase of enclosures, the slopes to the north
west, west, south west and south of the Showery Tor-Roughtor ridge were
subdivided by major linear boundaries into four large blocks rising to
300m-320m contour levels. Each except the south western block contains part of
the enclosure settlement at lower levels, accompanied by an area of cleared
pasture. The west, south west and southern blocks are defined by substantial
rubble boundaries radiating north west, west and SSW from the lower margins of
the Roughtor clitter. The topography prevents such radial definition for the
north western block and it is delimited to each side by boundaries ascending
the slope to meet at a midslope apex. The valley floor around the ridge
defines the lower edge for most blocks, however another linear boundary
completes the lower edge of the southern block, and the south western block
shows no closure across the saddle to Louden Hill and Stannon Down: it is
considered that the extent of the south western block on Roughtor formed
pasture for a settlement focus on the other side of the saddle.
The block-defining boundaries show marked differences in character
corresponding with their range of functions. For example, the north east
boundary of the north western block is a massive rubble bank, 400m long,
generally 6m-7.5m wide and 0.4m high, with coursed and edge-set slab facing on
each side. This is an important boundary in the organisation of later
prehistoric land use around the slope as it also separates the enclosed
pasture and settlement blocks from the cleared and unpartitioned land lacking
contemporary settlement over the north of the ridge. It shows alignments on
ridge-top landmarks crowned by prehistoric cairns: the lower two-thirds
aligned on Showery Tor, and most of the upper third aligned on Little
Roughtor. By contrast, the boundary that it meets at its upper end is a far
slighter rubble wall defining the south east of the block.
At least 17 prehistoric cairns with rubble mounds in the range 2.5m-12m across
occur in this scheduling, in addition to numerous smaller cairns. Eight show
structural features familiar from prehistoric funerary cairns elsewhere: edge-
set kerb slabs along the edge or crest of the mound, and three of these have
settings of central slabs suggesting a box-like funerary structure called a
cist. Two other cairns lack such structural detail but have a form common to
funerary cairns: a platform cairn, with a low flattened upper surface, is
located on the lower slope close to the massive linear boundary at the north
of the enclosure blocks; the other is a large round cairn beside the valley
floor west of Roughtor. The ten cairns with indications of a funerary origin
are well-dispersed across the middle and lower slopes but appear absent from
similar levels south and SSE of Roughtor. They show no clear differences in
size, distribution or relationships from cairns lacking positive evidence
for a funerary function and which appear to originate in the use and later
dismantling of the irregular field system, suggesting that rubble clearance
and funerary use were shared roles of such cairns.
The scheduling also contains at least six prehistoric religious structures
called kerbed boulders. Two types are apparent, both focussed on natural
boulders. In one, a relatively low slab or cluster of slabs is encircled by a
setting of edge-set slabs, 3.75m-6.5m across; three examples are present,
spaced 110m-225m apart on the midslope south and south west of Roughtor. In
the other type, a large upstanding boulder is adjoined by a low rubble wall,
again with edge-set slabs, defining a small rounded cleared area fronting a
vertical face of the boulder and variously 2m-7.5m across. The three examples
of this form are also well spaced, 230m-235m apart, but are located in the
margins of the upper slope clitter south west, SSW and SSE of Roughtor summit.
Those on the south west and SSW each include a very tall end-set slab, 1.1m
and 1.5m high respectively and leaning with one flat face oriented to the
Roughtor summit outcrops.
Vegetation and excavated evidence indicates general retraction of settlement
from the south western moors by the early 1st millennium BC: abandonment of
the settlements with enclosures in this scheduling is likely to correspond
with this. Late prehistoric occupation is however considered likely for an
unusual feature resembling an intercutting cluster of five hut circles within
a large enclosure on the lower slope south of Roughtor. Within the thickness
of their shared wall rubble, the internal areas form small irregular chambers,
analogous with Iron Age to Romano-British house forms further west in
Cornwall.
Later settlement appears with small structures called transhumance huts,
seasonal shelters for herdsmen tending stock moved to the moor for summer
pasture. Elsewhere, their relationships with other features indicates a
largely early medieval date. Their low rubble walls enclose small rectangular
internal areas about 3m-5m long by 2.5m wide. At least six transhumance huts
have been recognised in the scheduling, widely scattered across the midslope,
in each case built from rubble taken from adjacent prehistoric structures:
three are built into former hut circles and two adjoin a prehistoric linear
boundary and one reuses walling of the prehistoric irregular field system on
the south slope.
The organisation of later medieval agriculture made a more substantial impact
on the area of this scheduling. The lower slope north west of Roughtor was
taken into the private pasture belonging to the medieval tenement of Stannon,
the bulk of which extended south west across Stannon Down, beyond this
scheduling. Stannon's pasture on this slope was defined from the common
grazing on the higher slopes by a long low boundary bank, 1.18km long and
accompanied for much of its length by a ditch on its upslope side. The bank is
largely heaped rubble with low edge-set slabs but its character varies
considerably, depending on its proximity to prehistoric structures whose
robbing provided most of its rubble. Near its midpoint, this pasture boundary
includes the base slab of a medieval wayside cross, a subrectangular slab, 1m
long and 0.2m thick, with a tapering rectangular mortice slot in its upper
surface. It is considered to be near its original position on a route across
the common land, keeping close to the edge of the private pasture. A second,
slightly larger, medieval cross base slab in this scheduling, with a fully
perforated mortice, leans against a boulder in the clitter SSW of Roughtor.
More extensive remains in the scheduling derive from a resettlement of the
Moor apparent from about the 12th century AD. A discrete block of fields was
laid out on the SSE slope of Roughtor eventually encompassing about 7.5ha, to
form an outfield: an area of cultivation detached from the more intensively
cultivated land around a settlement's focus, in this instance the medieval
settlement at Fernacre, to the south east beyond this scheduling. The surface
features and pattern of subdivision within the outfield block reveal its
inclusion of various prehistoric features, at least two major phases of
enlargement, and differing intensities of cultivation within its plots. The
core of the outfield reuses an ovoid prehistoric enclosure whose interior
was partitioned into three plots by downslope rubble and slab banks. The plots
are strongly lynchetted and have prominent downslope cultivation ridges with
occasional mounds of cleared rubble, often on or against ground-fast boulders
too large to be moved.
The outfield underwent its first major expansion by the addition of three
large sub-rectangular areas, in clockwise order from the upper wall of the
reused prehistoric enclosure, leaving it as the south west sector of a much
larger outfield covering 250m across the slope by up to 220m down the slope.
These enlarged areas were defined and subdivided by mostly straight walls and
banks, with only limited reuse of prehistoric walls. Both upslope areas of the
enlarged outfield were subdivided into three downslope strips, again strongly
lynchetted with marked downslope cultivation ridging and scattered clearance
mounds, though the upper third of the north western area shows less intensive
use. The outfield's south east area was cleared of surface stone but
subdivision only partitions its western quarter, with cultivation ridges over
its upper half; the rest of this sector shows only faint ridging, due either
to less intensive use or subsequent masking by peaty soil development. The
outfield's upper levels show scarps and clearance mounds where prehistoric
irregular field system walls were removed, but at least three rounded
prehistoric plots survive intact beyond the outfield's upslope walls; traces
of ridging on their surfaces show medieval reuse as a short-term extension of
the outfield.
The second major enlargement of the outfield extended its area 65m-110m to the
south west, defined by a sinuous wall refurbishing prehistoric walling in
places: most of this extension's south east wall reuses a prehistoric linear
boundary along the foot of the slope. This enlarged area was divided into four
broad north east-south west strips, crossing the slope diagonally; the strips'
dividing banks meet the outer boundary at an upslope curve mirrored by a
strong lynchet behind them, reflecting the need to turn the plough team at the
foot of the field. Cultivation ridging, marked lynchetting and clearance
mounds are again visible, though the highest and lowest strips, on the north
west and south east sides respectively, show less intensive use.
Abandonment of the outfield corresponds with a wider late medieval retraction
from moorland cultivation from the later 14th century AD onwards. The
expansion of common grazing to encompass the outfield and the formerly private
pasture of the Stannon's tenement leaves few tangible features from a dominant
land use which persists to the present day. However remains of four well-built
shelters serving post-medieval herdsmen and their stock do survive on the
midslopes west and south of Roughtor. Their coursed rubble walls enclose
narrow interiors, about 3m long by 1.5m wide, though the largest example on
the western slope had a small chamber added to its northern end while another
to the south had a small slab-built fireplace and adjacent cupboard. Those on
the southern slope, built against massive boulders, have very low entrances
and were roofed by long slender slabs.
Other post-medieval activities are apparent in this scheduling. Numerous
stone grubbing pits occur where boulders have been exposed for splitting or
have often been removed altogether. The distinctive marks from `wedge-
splitting' on surviving split faces shows that most stone splitting in this
scheduling took place prior to AD 1800. Abandoned roughouts from moorstone
working include, most frequently, millstones but also an unfinished trough and
a cider mill stone. Peat cutting for fuel produced numerous small platforms
fringing the valley floors where the cut peat, locally called turf, was
stacked for storage awaiting transport off the Moor. Three platforms occur in
the north west of this scheduling, each with a rectangular central area
surrounded by a shallow ditch and a low outer bank. Peat cutting in a raised
bog in the south of this scheduling exposed prehistoric field system and
boundary remains on an old land surface.
Major cross-moor routes have used this common pasture from the medieval period
onwards, giving rise to the two cross-bases in this scheduling. A later
trackway shown on 19th century Ordnance Survey maps runs roughly north-south
across the midslope north west of Roughtor, its course still visible over 100m
as a hollow way which breaks through the massive prehistoric linear boundary
in the north of this scheduling.
All vegetation monitoring equipment is excluded from the scheduling, although
the ground beneath it is included.

MAP EXTRACT
The site of the monument is shown on the attached map extract.
It includes a 2 metre boundary around the archaeological features,
considered to be essential for the monument's support and preservation.

Source: Historic England

Reasons for Scheduling

The complex array of archaeological remains in this scheduling around the
slopes of Roughtor provides one of the finest examples of a landscape
palimpsest in the country, its diversity of surviving features demonstrating
the major phases in prehistoric to post-medieval land use changes on these
slopes. The good survival of prehistoric remains gives rare insights into an
unusually long development of activities, in considerable detail and over a
sufficiently extensive area to demonstrate variations in population, farming
methods, the size of agricultural and social units, and the important role of
the underlying topography in the organisation of those factors. Of particular
importance in this scheduling is the preservation of details such as the
differing linear boundary forms, the selective robbing or reuse of earlier
walls and hut circles, and the presence of kerbed boulders, which illustrate
how prehistoric communities regarded the landscape and the remains they
encountered from its earlier users. These are also important aspects relevant
to the medieval features, whose major components: the outfield, the pasture
boundary and the cross-bases, survive very well and show how much wider were
the influences which determined the nature and disposition of remains from
this period within this scheduling. The large outfield also merits mention as
one of the most intact and unmodified examples nationally, retaining a
particularly comprehensive range of surviving features.
Because of their unusually good and extensive archaeological survival, the
remains in this scheduling receive frequent mention in national and regional
archaeological reviews.

Source: Historic England

Sources

Books and journals
Langdon, A G, Stone Crosses in East Cornwall, (1996)
Sharpe, A, Minions: An Archaeological Survey of the Caradon Mining District, (1993)
Sharpe, A, Minions: An Archaeological Survey of the Caradon Mining District, (1993)
Christie, P M, Rose, P G, 'Cornish Archaeology' in Davidstow Moor, Cornwall. The Medieval And Later Sites., (1987), 163-195
Christie, P M, Rose, P G, 'Cornish Archaeology' in Davidstow Moor, Cornwall. The Medieval And Later Sites., (1987), 163-195
Johnson, N, Rose, P, 'The Human Landscape to c 1800' in Bodmin Moor An Archaeological Survey, , Vol. 1, (1994)
Johnson, N, Rose, P, 'The Human Landscape to c 1800' in Bodmin Moor An Archaeological Survey, , Vol. 1, (1994)
Johnson, N, Rose, P, 'The Human Landscape to c 1800' in Bodmin Moor An Archaeological Survey, , Vol. 1, (1994)
Johnson, N, Rose, P, 'The Human Landscape to c 1800' in Bodmin Moor An Archaeological Survey, , Vol. 1, (1994)
Johnson, N, Rose, P, 'The Human Landscape to c 1800' in Bodmin Moor An Archaeological Survey, , Vol. 1, (1994)
Johnson, N, Rose, P, 'The Human Landscape to c 1800' in Bodmin Moor An Archaeological Survey, , Vol. 1, (1994)
Johnson, N, Rose, P, 'The Human Landscape to c 1800' in Bodmin Moor An Archaeological Survey, , Vol. 1, (1994)
Johnson, N, Rose, P, 'The Human Landscape to c 1800' in Bodmin Moor An Archaeological Survey, , Vol. 1, (1994)
Johnson, N, Rose, P, 'The Human Landscape to c 1800' in Bodmin Moor An Archaeological Survey, , Vol. 1, (1994)
Johnson, N, Rose, P, 'The Human Landscape to c 1800' in Bodmin Moor An Archaeological Survey, , Vol. 1, (1994)
Johnson, N, Rose, P, 'The Human Landscape to c 1800' in Bodmin Moor An Archaeological Survey, , Vol. 1, (1994)
Johnson, N, Rose, P, 'The Human Landscape to c 1800' in Bodmin Moor An Archaeological Survey, , Vol. 1, (1994)
Johnson, N, Rose, P, 'The Human Landscape to c 1800' in Bodmin Moor An Archaeological Survey, , Vol. 1, (1994)
Johnson, N, Rose, P, 'The Human Landscape to c 1800' in Bodmin Moor An Archaeological Survey, , Vol. 1, (1994)
Johnson, N, Rose, P, 'The Human Landscape to c 1800' in Bodmin Moor An Archaeological Survey, , Vol. 1, (1994)
Johnson, N, Rose, P, 'The Human Landscape to c 1800' in Bodmin Moor An Archaeological Survey, , Vol. 1, (1994)
Johnson, N, Rose, P, 'The Human Landscape to c 1800' in Bodmin Moor An Archaeological Survey, , Vol. 1, (1994)
Johnson, N, Rose, P, 'The Human Landscape to c 1800' in Bodmin Moor An Archaeological Survey, , Vol. 1, (1994)
Johnson, N, Rose, P, 'The Human Landscape to c 1800' in Bodmin Moor An Archaeological Survey, , Vol. 1, (1994)
Other
CAU, 1:100 survey plan GRH 124/7/11, (1984)
CAU, 1:1000 Bodmin Moor Survey plan SX 1480 NW, (1985)
CAU, 1:1000 Plan and explanatory overlay for SX 1480 NW, SW, NE, SE, (1984)
CAU, 1:1000 Survey and explanatory overlay; SX 1480 SW; SX 1480 NE & SE, (1984)
CAU, 1:1000 Survey plan and explanatory overlay SX 1381 NE, (1985)
CAU, 1:1000 Survey plan and explanatory overlay SX 1480 NE, (1985)
CAU, 1:1000 Survey plan and explanatory overlay SX 1480 NW & SW, (1985)
CAU, 1:1000 Survey plan and explanatory overlay SX 1480 NW, (1985)
CAU, 1:1000 Survey plan and explanatory overlay SX 1480 SE & NE, (1985)
CAU, 1:1000 Survey plan and explanatory overlay SX 1480 SE, (1985)
CAU, 1:1000 Survey plan and explanatory overlay SX 1480 SW & SE, (1985)
CAU, 1:1000 Survey plan and explanatory overlay SX 1480 SW, (1985)
CAU, 1:1000 Survey plan and explanatory overlay SX 1481 NW, (1985)
CAU, 1:1000 Survey plan and explanatory overlay SX 1481 SE, (1984)
CAU, 1:1000 Survey plan and explanatory overlay SX 1481 SW, (1984)
CAU, 1:1000 Survey plan and explanatory overlay SX 1481 SW, (1985)
CAU, 1:1000 Survey plan and explanatory overlay SX 1481 SW, (1985)
CAU, 1:1000 Survey plan and explanatory overlay; SX 1480 NW & SW, (1984)
CAU, 1:1000 Survey plan and explanatory overlay; SX 1480 NW & SW, (1985)
CAU, 1:1000 Survey plan and explanatory overlay; SX 1480 SW & SE, (1984)
CAU, 1:1000 Survey plan and explanatory overlay; SX 1480 SW, (1984)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entries PRN 3291 & 3292, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entries PRN 3291; 3292; 3297; 3306, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entries PRN 3315 & 3318,
CAU, Cornwall SMR entries PRN 3315; 3316; 3318,
CAU, Cornwall SMR entries; PRN 3315; 3320; 3321; 3322,
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 12402, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3286.10, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3286.11, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3286.12, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3286.2, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3286.3, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3286.4, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3286.5, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3286.6, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3286.7, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3286.9, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3287.2, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3287.3, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3287.4, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3291, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3292, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3294, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3295, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3297, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3299.1, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3299.2, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3299.3, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3299.4, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3299.5, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3299.6, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3300, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3301, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3302, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3305, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3309, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3312, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3313, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3314.1, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3314.2, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3314.3, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3314.4, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3315,
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3315, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3316,
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3323, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3324, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3325, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3328,
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3329, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3330, (1985)
CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3331, (1997)
Includes 1:100 survey plan, CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3286.8, (1985)
Not completed, CAU, Cornwall SMR entry PRN 3332,
p 80, CAU, Bodmin Moor: An Archaeological Survey, The Human Landscape to c 1800, (1994)
Title: 1:10000 Ordnance Survey Map SX 18 SW
Source Date: 1982
Author:
Publisher:
Surveyor:

Title: 1:10000 Ordnance Survey Map; SX 18 SW
Source Date: 1982
Author:
Publisher:
Surveyor:

Source: Historic England

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