Ancient Monuments

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Monastic grange, 180m south of Manor Farm

A Scheduled Monument in Etton, East Riding of Yorkshire

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Coordinates

Latitude: 53.8796 / 53°52'46"N

Longitude: -0.5191 / 0°31'8"W

OS Eastings: 497446.406887

OS Northings: 443620.201295

OS Grid: SE974436

Mapcode National: GBR SRTL.D0

Mapcode Global: WHGDX.0R25

Entry Name: Monastic grange, 180m south of Manor Farm

Scheduled Date: 13 February 1952

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1005201

English Heritage Legacy ID: ER 189

County: East Riding of Yorkshire

Civil Parish: Etton

Built-Up Area: Etton

Traditional County: Yorkshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): East Riding of Yorkshire

Church of England Parish: Etton St Mary

Church of England Diocese: York

Details

This monument includes the earthworks of a medieval monastic grange situated on gently rising land on the north side of the village of Etton. The grange survives as a series of low earthworks and buried deposits spread across a rectangular enclosure around 150m north to south and 85m east to west, all enclosed by a substantial bank which stands up to nearly 2m high and 5m wide.
Partial excavation during the 1960's revealed cobbled roadways, granaries, a central hall and a brewhouse dating to the mid 13th century when the grange belonged to the Knights Templars. The Knights Templars held considerable property in Etton belonging to their Preceptory at Faxfleet. Documentary sources indicate that the grange, which included a chapel, later became a manor. The site was abandoned as a result of the dissolution of the Order of the Knights Templars in 1314 but then subsequently passed into the hands of the Knights Hospitallers as a manor, holding it until the dissolution of their Order in 1541. The excavations showed that during this second period, further buildings, including new roadways, granaries, brewhouse and hall were constructed.

SOURCES
PastScape Monument No:-64302
NMR:- SE94SE6
Humber SMR No:- 753

Source: Historic England

Reasons for Scheduling

A monastic grange was a farm owned and run by a monastic community and independent of the secular manorial system of communal agriculture and servile labour. The function of granges was to provide food and raw materials for consumption within the parent monastic house itself, and also to provide surpluses for sale for profit. No region was without monastic granges. The exact number of sites which originally existed is not precisely known but can be estimated, on the basis of numbers of monastic sites, at several thousand. Of these, however, only a small percentage can be accurately located on the ground today. Of this group of identifiable sites, continued intensive use of many has destroyed much of the evidence of archaeological remains. In view of the importance of granges to medieval rural and monastic life, all sites exhibiting good archaeological survival are identified as nationally important.
The Monastic grange to the south of Manor Farm, is well preserved. The monument retains valuable information relating to its layout and also its construction, use and abandonment. This monument adds to our understanding of medieval society and economy, providing an insight into two significant medieval organisations: the Orders of the Knights Templars and Hospitallers.

Source: Historic England

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