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Medieval longhouse settlement (known locally as Lamlavery), and an associated field system

A Scheduled Monument in St. Clether, Cornwall

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Coordinates

Latitude: 50.6192 / 50°37'8"N

Longitude: -4.6056 / 4°36'20"W

OS Eastings: 215775.839748

OS Northings: 83178.531327

OS Grid: SX157831

Mapcode National: GBR N7.BBSY

Mapcode Global: FRA 177F.PJH

Entry Name: Medieval longhouse settlement (known locally as Lamlavery), and an associated field system

Scheduled Date: 15 July 1977

Last Amended: 11 July 2014

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1004609

English Heritage Legacy ID: CO 1046

County: Cornwall

Civil Parish: St. Clether

Traditional County: Cornwall

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Cornwall

Church of England Parish: Davidstow

Church of England Diocese: Truro

Summary

The site, covering an area of circa 0.81km by 0.6km, includes the earthwork and buried remains of a longhouse settlement, probably medieval in origins, of at least five long houses with associated ancillary buildings, a trackway and associated field system situated on a north-west facing slope to the east of Crowdy Marsh on Davidstow Moor.

Source: Historic England

Details

PRINCIPAL FEATURES
The site, covering an area of circa 0.81km by 0.6km, includes the earthwork and buried remains of a longhouse settlement, probably medieval in origin, of at least five long houses with associated ancillary buildings, a trackway and an associated field system situated on a north-west facing slope to the east of Crowdy Marsh on Davidstow Moor.

DESCRIPTION
The settlement survives as at least five long houses with associated ancillary buildings defined by stony banks of up to 3.6m wide and 0.7m high with enclosures including irregularly-shaped garden plots which are defined by stone and earth built banks of up to 0.5m high. The long houses measure 17m long by 8.5m wide on average and have opposed entrances in their long walls but the internal divisions are not clearly discernible. The ancillary buildings may be parallel to the long houses or isolated structures. The hollow of a track way runs to the east of the houses on a north-east to south-west alignment for approximately 535m. The houses are surrounded by a strip field system, particularly to the south-west (about 0.5 by 0.3km) and to east (about 0.42 by 0.17km) of the track way. The field system ridge and furrow earthworks survive up to 0.5m high, particularly near to the settlement.

EXTENT OF SCHEDULING
The area of protection includes the earthwork and buried remains of the settlement known locally as Lamlavery and associated areas of ridge and furrow. The north-west boundary is defined by the marsh field boundary (including a modern fence); the boundaries to the north-east, south-east and south-west have been drawn to include a 5m margin around them to provide sufficient protection for the surviving earthworks.

EXCLUSIONS
All modern fences and signage are excluded from the scheduling, although the ground beneath all of these is, however, included.

Source: Historic England

Reasons for Scheduling

The medieval longhouse settlement (known locally as Lamlavery), 1160m west-south-west of Newpark, and the associated field system are scheduled for the following principal reasons:

* Survival: the earthworks of the settlement survive well and are associated with an area of ridge and furrow that also survive as earthworks;

* Diversity: the site contains a good range of features such as the earthwork and buried remains of building platforms, trackways, enclosures and a field system relating to its occupation and farming practices during the medieval period;

* Potential: the stratified archaeological deposits have the potential to provide further evidence to increase understanding of the character and occupation of the settlement within the wider medieval landscape;

* Documentation: the medieval settlement is referenced in historical documents and is well-documented by aerial photography and field survey;

* Group value: the settlement forms part of the archaeological landscape of Bodmin Moor, a well-recorded upland area with a wide variety of surviving examples of land-use from the prehistoric period onwards. Lamlavery has particularly strong group value with a number of nearby scheduled settlements including the medieval settlement near Canaglaze (National Heritage List entry 1007278) to the south-east.

Source: Historic England

Sources

Books and journals
Johnson, N, Rose, P, 'The Human Landscape to c 1800' in Bodmin Moor An Archaeological Survey, (1994)
Preston-Jones, A, Rose, P, 'Cornish Archaeology' in Medieval Cornwall, (1986)
Other
National Mapping Project Data for Bodmin Moor,
Number: 3512 Name: LAMLAVERY - Medieval settlement, Medieval longhouse, Cornwall and Scilly Historic Environment Record ,
Number: 3512.10 Name: DAVIDSTOW MOOR - Medieval field system, Medieval trackway, Cornwall and Scilly Historic Environment Record,
PastScape Monument No:-434263,

Source: Historic England

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