Ancient Monuments

History on the Ground

This site is entirely user-supported. See how you can help.

Holne Chase Castle

A Scheduled Monument in Widecombe in the Moor, Devon

Approximate Location Map
Large Map »
Street or Overhead View
Contributor Photos »

If Google Street View is available, the image is from the best available vantage point looking, if possible, towards the location of the monument. Where it is not available, the satellite view is shown instead.

Coordinates

Latitude: 50.533 / 50°31'58"N

Longitude: -3.8013 / 3°48'4"W

OS Eastings: 272437.477195

OS Northings: 71906.737249

OS Grid: SX724719

Mapcode National: GBR QF.MTF8

Mapcode Global: FRA 27XN.BX9

Entry Name: Holne Chase Castle

Scheduled Date: 29 November 1950

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1003842

English Heritage Legacy ID: DV 251

County: Devon

Civil Parish: Widecombe in the Moor

Traditional County: Devon

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Devon

Church of England Parish: Holne St Mary the Virgin

Church of England Diocese: Exeter

Summary

Slight univallate hillfort called Holne Chase Castle.

Source: Historic England

Details

This record was the subject of a minor enhancement on 4 November 2015. This record has been generated from an "old county number" (OCN) scheduling record. These are monuments that were not reviewed under the Monuments Protection Programme and are some of our oldest designation records.

This monument includes a slight univallate hillfort situated on the north facing side of a prominent hill called Holne Chase overlooking the valley of the River Dart. The hillfort survives as an oval enclosure measuring 120m long by 96m wide internally, defined by a single rampart and ditch with a counterscarp bank present to the north east, west and south west. It has two entrances, a simple gap to the south east and an inturned entrance to the south west. Within the enclosure are four circular cairns and two rectangular depressions thought to be a result of stone quarrying and excavation trenches. Finds of a partial excavation in 1905 produced pottery and Iron Age currency bars.

Source: Historic England

Reasons for Scheduling

Slight univallate hillforts are defined as enclosures of various shapes, generally between 1ha and 10ha in size, situated on or close to hilltops and defined by a single line of earthworks, the scale of which is relatively small. They date to between the Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age (eighth - fifth centuries BC), the majority being used for 150 to 200 years prior to their abandonment or reconstruction. Slight univallate hillforts have generally been interpreted as stock enclosures, redistribution centres, places of refuge and permanent settlements. The earthworks generally include a rampart, narrow level berm, external ditch and counterscarp bank, while access to the interior is usually provided by two entrances comprising either simple gaps in the earthwork or an inturned rampart. Slight univallate hillforts are rare nationally, although in Devon they comprise one of the major classes of hillfort. Slight univallate hillforts are important for understanding the transition between Bronze Age and Iron Age communities. Despite stone quarrying, mineral extraction and charcoal burning in and around the hillfort, Holne Chase Castle survives comparatively well and will contain important archaeological and environmental evidence relating to its construction, use and landscape context.

Source: Historic England

Sources

Other
PastScape Monument No: 445282
Riley, H, Holne Chase Castle, Holne, Devon: a new survey by the Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England, Devon Archaeological Society Proceedings, No.53, (1995), 91 - 95

Source: Historic England

Other nearby scheduled monuments

AncientMonuments.uk is an independent online resource and is not associated with any government department. All government data published here is used under licence. Please do not contact AncientMonuments.uk for any queries related to any individual ancient or schedued monument, planning permission related to scheduled monuments or the scheduling process itself.

AncientMonuments.uk is a Good Stuff website.